KwaZulu Natal Tourism Zululand Home > Tourism > Zululand > Zulu Culture > Zulu Family > Family Structure KwaZulu Natal Tourism Zululand
Powered by FreeFind  
Zulu Culture Zulu Culture Updated:  Zulu Culture
 
Zulu Culture and SocietyZululand Towns
Zulu Culture and SocietyKZW Reserves
Zulu Culture and SocietyPrivate Reserves
Zulu Culture and SocietyAccommodation
Zulu Culture and SocietyZulu Culture
Zulu Culture and SocietyZulu Traditions

Zulu Culture
KwaZulu-Natal TourismDurban
KwaZulu-Natal TourismThe Battlefields
KwaZulu-Natal TourismThe Drakensberg
KwaZulu-Natal TourismZululand
KwaZulu-Natal TourismMaputaland
KwaZulu-Natal TourismThe Midlands
KwaZulu-Natal TourismThe North Coast
KwaZulu-Natal TourismThe South Coast
KwaZulu-Natal TourismEast Griqualand
Zulu Culture

Zulu Family Structure


Please note that this site is for Warthog Web Design and Durban Website Designers PORTFOLIO PURPOSES ONLY and may not be fully functional due to its age. The latest version of this website is here.


We have domestic accommodation available in Durban for the 2010 World Cup including shuttles to and from all the matches.
Escorted tours around Natal/Drakensberg/Battlefields and Zululand can be arranged

Contact Us!
Zulu Culture and Traditions
Please note that this site is for Warthog Web Design and Durban Website Designers PORTFOLIO PURPOSES ONLY and may not be fully functional due to its age. The latest version of this website is here.


We have domestic accommodation available in Durban for the 2010 World Cup including shuttles to and from all the matches.
Escorted tours around Natal/Drakensberg/Battlefields and Zululand can be arranged

Contact Us!
Zulu Culture

The relationships between various family members and others of the clan and the tribe were established hundreds of years ago.

Bringing up the Children

It is the duty of the wife to bring the children up and children are taught from an early age to respect elders and never speak unless spoken to. There is a complete lack of familiarity between father and son.

The wives are subservient to the husbands, bringing them their food before retiring to their own quarters. The husband will eat his fill and leave the rest for the remainder of his family.

The Boys

Boys are given a pet name when they are born, another name from his father when he is seven, another nickname from his herd-boy friends and finally another name should he enter one of the amabutho (regiments).

Naming protocols are similar for girls except that they may add a variety of Christian names. One also finds a variety of strange names that are related to an event close to the birth of the child - Lightning or Unfortunate are some names that may be used.

The boys are expected to look after the family's herds, leaving home each morning, returning for the daily milking and breakfast before taking the herd out again for the afternoon. One of their pastimes is stick fighting as preparation for entering military service.

Stick Fighting

The fighting is done either with a shield in one hand and a stick in the other or with a stick in each hand. Such sticks are of hardwood and approximately 700mm in length and can land a painful blow. At the age of fifteen, young boys will receive their very own spear from their fathers before the next step, which is carrying their elder brothers' accoutrements to military camps.

In this way, the boys are gradually introduced to the military way of life. The camps also introduce the boys the military legends, military successes and the respect, esprit de corps and honour that are attached the regiments.

The Girls

Tending the fireGirls are slowly introduced to the family chores by first learning how to carry water using a small gourd. She learns to carry the gourd on her head by means of braided supports that her mother applies to her head.

In the field, she is taught how to plant and reap the crops and is given her own hoe when she is eleven. By this age, she is capable of making a fire, preparing some simple dishes and looking after her younger brethren.

The Men

The man of the house deals with visitors, attends public meetings, makes all the decisions, owns the hut and its contents in their entirety and is solely charged with entering into any agreement. As the boys get older, they are also introduced to the adult responsibilities. The husband may also carve wooden spoons and other utensils.

If a family stretches over several kraals, an umnumzana (headman) is appointed whose job it is to arbitrate over small matters. Several of these will serve under an induna who sits in the lower house of the Royal Parliament.

The wives are in all respects inferior to the husbands. They are expected to look after all the children, tend the fields, carry the water, make pots and brew the beer. Often, the husband will pay greater attention to his herd than to his wives.

The Chief

Inkosi Ambrose Malinga The tribal chief is called an inkosi and is more than a chief but an arbiter, an object of reverence and respect and the figurehead for the entire group he is responsible for.

If a chief failed his king, not only would he be put to death but all his subjects. He was also at risk from his own offspring as age advanced and was thought to be prone to making wrong decisions.

Grandmother

The Zulu Grandmother is the object of reverence and exerts considerable influence. She lives in the large hut of the ancestors.

This website designed by Durban Website Designers

The URL of this page is:
www.warthog.co.za/dedt/tourism/culture/family/structure.htm
2006 Warthog Web Design
Please address comments to
the Webmaster.
Warthog Web Design Web Site Design and Development




 
Zulu Culture and SocietyPublicity Offices
Zulu Culture and SocietyReading List
Zulu Culture and SocietyLocal Map  Click here for an interactive popup map.
KwaZulu-Natal Info:
Zulu CultureDetailed Map
Zulu CultureTourist Information
Zulu CultureTour Operators
Zulu CultureSome Links
Zulu CultureKwaZulu Museums
Zulu Culture
Zulu Culture and SocietyFeedback Form
Zulu Culture and SocietyContact Us
Zulu CultureSite Map
Zulu Culture

Zulu CultureDoubleclick on
any blank space
to return to the
page top.



2010 Durban
Accommodation

Sea Cottage Self Catering Cottages

Self catering - Dolphin Coast on Natal's North Coast? two beachfront cottages at Sheffield Beach? Traditional Hand Made Soaps:
Sonalis Traditional
Hand Made Soaps

Quality Awnings:
4 Seasons Awnings
Real Handmade Soaps:
Handmade soaps
St. Lucia World Heritage Site Guest House
St. Lucia Wetlands Guest House
Self Catering Accommodation St. Lucia
St. Lucia Wilds
Granite and Caesarstone Worktops in Durban
Stone Zone
Accommodation in Zululand
Ghost Mountain Inn
Recommended Website Designers:
Durban Website Designers
Website Designers

Webpage Designers

Beachfront Self Catering on the Dolphin Coast
Sea Cottage





St. Lucia Wetlands Guest House Bed and Breakfast Accommodation in St. Lucia, Natal
Ghost Mountain Inn Bed and Breakfast Accommodation in Zululand
Blue Haze Country Lodge Accommodation in the Battlefields, Drakensberg and Midlands